Posts Tagged ‘bob Dylan’

Episode 027–Jeremy Parsons, “Burn This House Down” with Bruce Hilliard

Born in San Antonio, Texas, Jeremy Parsons grew up soaking in the sounds of Texas music in the dancehalls of the Lone Star State. Jeremy was always a fan of music, but it wasn’t until his later high school years that he discovered his knack for it. Driven by his passion, he taught himself to play the guitar and began to write and perform music.

Jeremy’s early influences include Hank Williams and George Strait. His spin on original writing combined with his unique voice award him a sound of his own. 

Over the past decade, Jeremy has played all over the U.S. and in Europe, including numerous venues in Texas. Pulling from the example of Texas performance artists, Jeremy loves to interact with his audience. He captivates the crowd with his genuine personality, unique humor, and heart-felt love of his occupation.

Jeremy draws from his personal experiences to create songs that are keenly perceptive and meaningful. His current single, “Burn This House Down,” paints a poignant picture of heartbreak and acceptance that still remains relatable. This song will stick with you long after your first listen. The song is currently in the IndieWorld Country Top 40. The video is nominated for a Monkey Bread Tree Film Festival award, an IMDB-sanctioned film festival.

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Episode 021–Elton John and Your Song by Bruce Hilliard

Sir Elton Hercules John, CBE (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight; 25 March 1947), is an English singer, pianist, and composer. He has worked with lyricist Bernie Taupin as his songwriting partner since 1967; they have collaborated on more than 30 albums to date. In his five-decade career Elton John has sold more than 300 million records, making him one of the best-selling music artists in the world. He has more than fifty Top 40 hits, including seven consecutive No. 1 US albums, 58 Billboard Top 40 singles, 27 Top 10, four No. 2 and nine No. 1. For 31 consecutive years (1970–2000) he had at least one song in the Billboard Hot 100. His tribute single “Candle in the Wind 1997”, re-penned in dedication to the late Princess Diana, sold over 33 million copies worldwide and is the best-selling single in the history of the UK and US singles charts. He has also composed music, produced records, and has occasionally acted in films.

Elton John announced his final tour Farewell Yellow Brick Road in January. It’s scheduled to begin September 8 in Allentown, PA.

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Episode 020–Jimi Hendrix by Bruce Hilliard

A long time ago in a 1960s Galaxy far, far away there was a teen dance club between Seattle and Tacoma called the Spanish Castle Ballroom. Built in 1931, it was a caricature of an ancient Moorish fairytale storybook castle highlighted with neon lights.  It was located an area known as “Midway” located just outside of city limits in unincorporated county land (now Sea-Tac) in order to escape the towns’ efforts to minimize nightlife.
In late ‘50s through the ‘60s the venue featured touring attractions from Roy Orbison to Johnny Rivers and the Beach Boys.  Several local bands, the Wailers, the Sonics, the Kingsmen (“Louie Louie”) and the Amazing Aztecs (Merrilee Rush of “Angel of the Morning” fame on vocals and keyboards) also performed.
Pat O’Day, one of Seattle’s legendary DJs of the era tells a story of a skinny little kid that hung out there and offered to help out.  In those days guitar amplifiers were small, too small to crank up and play at the volumes the bands played.  To make matters worse they would plug two guitars into one amp. Consequently, the amps blew up and that would be the end of the music for the night.
According to O’Day, one night a skinny young kid came up to him and said, “I always have my amp in my car. It’s a big Gibson so if the amps ever blow you can use mine…as long as I can stand in back and play.  Don’t worry, I know all the licks they do.”
O’Day, recalling the incident in a 2011 interview goes on the explain that 2 or 3 weeks later, sure enough Tiny Tony and Statics were playing. They blew their amps.  So who came to the rescue?  The skinny kid showed up and asked O’Day if the band needed his amp.  The up and coming promoter said, “Yeah, go get it.”  The band played on.
Years later Pat O’Day, by this point one of the owners if Concerts West, the largest concert company in the world at the time, was sitting in a dressing room with client superstar Jimi Hendrix.  Jimi asked him, “Do you remember where we first met?”
Pat asked, “With the attorneys?”
“Do you remember the kid at the Spanish Castle that loaned you the amp when the band’s blew up?”
The kid was James Marshall Hendrix, a.k.a Jimi Hendrix, later the writer of “Spanish Castle Magic” from the album Axis Bold as Love.

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Episode 016–Tom Petty Damns the Torpedos by Bruce Hilliard

There were many legends that passed this year. Many musicians including Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, Al Jarreau, Mel Tillis, J. Geils and Walter Becker. There were others but I chose Tom Petty for the final episode of 2017. He was loved and respected by many and one of my personal musical influences.

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Episode 013–“Jingle Jangle Morning” with author Richie Unterberger

Richie Unterberger is a music and travel writer and editor who lives in San Francisco. He is author of Unknown Legends of Rock’n’Roll (Miller Freeman), which profiles 60 of the most interesting cult rock acts of all time; its sequel, Urban Spacemen & Wayfaring Strangers: Overlooked Innovators & Eccentric Visionaries of ’60s Rock (Miller Freeman);…

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